Why is it that every time I get an eyeful of the newest tactic or propaganda to alert the public to the fact we’re mired in a “war of lies” in Iraq, I’m reminded of liberals’ inability to adapt to a situation? Case in point – Cindy Sheehan.

The woman, who only weeks ago was camped out in a ditch demanding to speak to President George W. Bush about the war effort, is now a full-fledged political activist whose one goal is to stop the “illegal” war.

Last weekend, she was featured as a speaker at an anti-war rally in Washington, D.C., as the grieving mother of a son killed in combat. Since when does “grieving” mean traveling across the country spewing rhetoric and spite during movements coordinated by public relations teams? It’s sad when liberals don’t even know how to mourn properly and respectfully.

Sheehan is looked upon by many as a magically uniting voice for the liberal left and the large base of the Democratic Party who are against the War on Terror.

Of course, the Ditch Witch is more than happy to crawl out of her roadside trench and oblige, since two major hurricanes, in less than a month, blew her hocus-pocus protest fodder right off the front pages.

But, there was a notable lack of presence at the D.C. rally, which was scheduled to last all weekend.

While its organizers planned to draw up to 100,000 protesters, not one of them would be a high-ranking Democratic leader. No Hillary Clinton. No Chuck Schumer. No John Kerry. No, not even Howard Dean – the rabid Vermonter whose unsuccessful campaign for the 2004 presidency revolved around his detest for the war – dared show his face at the protest.

Spokesmen for the big names of the “Party of the People” said that their Democratic bosses all had “scheduling conflicts” with the protest this weekend. Their reasoned approach to explaining their absence is much like the Democrats’ stance on “cutting middle-class tax”- everything but the first word.

It makes me almost gleeful – or as close as a heartless conservative can come to showing happiness – that the Democratic Party is so divided on the issues.

“There are a lot of people here who are wondering, where are the Democrats?” Tom Andrews, a former Democratic House member from Maine who currently runs the leftist lie machine Win Without War, said. Andrews continued, “The Democratic Party has an identity crisis on this issue. We need voices. We need leadership. But fear is driving them.”

Well duh, silly liberals. Why would the morally bankrupt leaders of your party risk losing election to stand by the side of anarchists as they hold hands and hug trees – or light poles, each other, or whatever’s available – outside of the White House gates? Fraternizing with Sheehan’s band of supporters is effectively overdosing on political cyanide.

While the leaders of the Dems wait in the shadows for the next opportunity in which it will be fashionable, their party is splintering into even more radical sects.

When Bush said in his first inauguration speech that he was a uniter, he wasn’t lying – he’s united the Right while fragmenting the Left.

Just as Ronald Reagan presided over the breakup of the liberals’ favorite country – the Soviet Union – George W. Bush may be presiding over the breakup of the Democratic Party.

Sansky can be reached at esansky@campustimes.org.



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