From the Archives

From the Archives: The ‘Fuji-UR-Kodak Affair,’ revisited

Larry Maushard wrote in a seething letter to the CT, “I […] would feel like an academic prostitute if I was part of the school’s current administration.”

From the Archives: The mystery of the Rush Rhees ghost

Further sightings were reported, like Bob Weiss’ first-person account in the Campus: “He’s come back! The restless spirit of Pete Nicosia has again been seen in the library.”

From the Archives: Larry Fine and the Empty Closet

“On the last day of Passover, I met, for the first time, a person who was openly gay,” Fine wrote. “As the sun set on that Jewish holiday of freedom, I set down a ten-year burden and was set free.”

From the Archives: UR’s Gates gave morphine its structure

Marshall Gates Jr., a renowned UR chemist, described his morphine synthesis as “by a considerable margin the best and most important work I’ve ever done.”

Before Quad Fox, there was Rinky: Siberian husky and perennial SA candidate

A Siberian husky who prowled campus in the ‘70s and ‘80s, Rinky earned around 15 percent of the vote in multiple SA presidential elections.

From the Archives: ‘Grapevine’ and ‘Kesher,’ relics of UR’s cultural past

“Grapevine” ran from 1975 to 1991, and “Kesher” between 1983 and 1993. Today, they represent relics of a time when a larger variety of publications populated the newstands, when the printed page was a more dominant form of communication.

From the Archives: ‘Frosh’ and ‘Sophs’ get messy in Flag Rush tradition

A “horde of wildly excited and yelling freshmen who were besmeared with the combination of lampblack, grease and flour” vied for the glory of being the one to snatch the flag from the grips of the sophomore class.

From the Archives: President O’Brien’s name change controversy

O’Brien championed an effort to change UR’s name to the more prestigious sounding “Eastman University.” After his administration drew fire for stiff tuition increases and continued business with South Africa despite apartheid, this slight to the school’s identity was the last straw for many students.

Sue B’s carriage ride for coeducation

Half a year after women were officially admitted to UR, Susan B. Anthony would write in a letter to a friend: “I shall never regret that day’s labor."

Students stage sit-in to protest Vietnam War

On May 10, 1972, 100 students surrounded the University’s administration building, clamoring to speak with President Robert Sproull and Chancellor…