Rockstar Games released “Grand Theft Auto V” on Sept. 17, selling over one billion copies in two days, making it the fastest selling entertainment product in history. Building on its success, Rockstar has already announced that the series’ next installment will be based on Rochester, N.Y.

Each “GTA” title is set in a fictional American city that is based heavily on a real-life city (Liberty City is New York City, Vice City is Miami, Los Santos is Los Angeles).

The playable area of “GTA VI” is expected to be the smallest of any Rockstar game and will likely include local landmarks like High Falls, Lake Ontario, and the Dibellas on Jefferson Road.

Criticisms about the choice in setting have already emerged, and both the official Rockstar and GTA Twitter accounts have encountered a slew of expletive-filled rants.

Among these objections is concern that the map will be way too small and offer no activities.

“The only guaranteed aspect of ‘GTA VI’ is bowling with Roman Bellic,” a Rockstar spokesperson said.

Vince Zapella, a co-founder of Infinity Ward and lead developer of the “Call of Duty” series, died laughing after hearing the announcement and choking on a dinner roll.

Zapella’s colleague Grant Collier said that the release date of “Call of Duty: Ghosts” will consequently be postponed even though the only people who still play “Call of Duty” are in middle school.

“Rockstar finally reached the point where it became so successful that it stopped caring about the game quality,” Collier said. “We stopped caring after ‘Modern Warfare 2.’”

Borovcanin is a member of the class of 2014.

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