Courtesy of http://bakerubloggers.wordpress.com.

As exam time nears, and yet another school year comes to an end, the time for studying is upon us. The usual anxiety, cramming and all-nighters become the norm, as everyone is working and studying diligently to achieve the highest grade possible to either move up to the next year or graduate. This is the definition of college life to the utmost and is certainly an integral part of the overall college experience. Nearly everyone goes through it at one point or another.

As a person who knows this firsthand, I can certainly sympathize with the masses during this time of test-taking. I’ll be the first to admit that, along with my other college companions, I’ve done my share of the aforementioned strategies in my quest to achieve the ultimate goal. I’ll also be the first to admit that it has not always been easy.  I’ve had my share of trials and tribulations.  There’s no denying that I am in good company, since we all at one time or another have gone through similar circumstances. These experiences, however, have enriched my college and personal experience in many ways, and have made me the person I am today.

With this in mind, I have come up with three common principles that I have implemented and continue to implement in order to sustain, guide, and uplift me through these and other trying times.

Believe in yourself. This seems like basic common sense. However, this is a very crucial element in order to obtain the best possible results. For if you don’t believe and have confidence in yourself, then neither will anyone else.  Nor will you achieve the desired results of the attainment of a goal.

This means that you must have faith and trust that you will achieve the desired outcome, regardless of the obstacles and roadblocks set before you. Of course, you will have to put in the work and dedication necessary to achieve maximum results, which leads me to my second principle.

Implement. Nothing great was ever done just merely wishing and hoping to do it, and wondering what it would be like to achieve it.

Nor was it ever done overnight. You must diligently and graciously apply yourself in some way each and every day to bring yourself closer to where you want or need to be.

In the case of exams, if you have been studying the subject matter consistently during the semester, last-minute cramming  would be kept to a bare minimum if not totally alleviated, and the outcome of the exam should be acceptable, if not desirable.
In life, if you strive a little each day towards the achievement of a goal, you would most likely achieve better results than if you did it all at once, or not at all. Hence the popular saying, just a little preparation goes a long way.

Faith and belief in almighty God. This is the most crucial principle of all. For God alone is the root of all life and living. Nothing can live or come to fruition without His approval or blessing. The fact that we are all living, regardless of our beliefs and current status, is a testimony of His love and power. With that in mind, we should take time out of our busy schedules to give praise to the one by whom our schedules and fortunes are possible.  Hence, Luke 1:37: “For with God nothing will be impossible.”

There you have it. These are three principles from yours truly in the endeavor to pass exams and to do well in life. As always,  I wish everyone the best of luck in their respective exams, and in all that they do.  Until next time, take care, peace, love and happiness, and God bless.



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