If you haven’t made plans for spring break yet, it’s not too late. While it might be a little late to try to plan an extravagant trip to the Caribbean — unless you’re feeling exceptionally adventurous — there are some closer destinations that would still give you a chance to forget the stress of midterms and experience a change of pace. One of the best parts about Rochester is that it is within driving distance of some exciting destinations, and this coming week will be the perfect chance to explore these places.

New York CityNew York is such a legendary city it hardly needs an explanation. It has everything from great museums, like the Metropolitan Museum of Art, to some of the best shopping in the country, clubs, restaurants and excellent theatrical performances. Something that is fun to do and oftentimes free is sit in on a taping of a TV show like the “Late Show with David Letterman” or even a not as well-known show like “Last Call with Carson Daly.” New York is the most expensive of the list to travel to, with a round trip ticket on Amtrak costing $148. JetBlue Airways is a faster and slightly cheaper alternative, with ticket prices currently at $137, although the train is more convenient. Hotel prices are all around $100 per night for such places as the Hotel Pennsylvania and the Edison Hotel.

BostonEven though it’s a bit of a drive, Boston is an awesome city and can be reached in approximately seven hours by car. It has its share of historical sites to explore, along with an amazing aquarium and plenty of good shopping. Boston is also home to many fine restaurants and fun clubs to enjoy at night. For $122 Amtrak will take you right to South Station. Hotel prices start at $80 per night for the Days Inn and go up to $99 per night at the Double Tree Club.

MontrealJust a five-hour drive, Montreal is a unique city, both geographically and culturally. It boasts great shopping, along with historical sites, museums and cultural attractions to keep you busy. There is also a lot of great food, plays and jazz clubs. At night be sure to catch the awesome bars and clubs, along with a casino. Montreal is a bit more expensive to get to, with a round trip Amtrak ticket going for $147. Hotels range fron $60 per night at the Quality Hotel to $86 per night for the Renaissance Hotel.

TorontoToronto is a little closer, and takes about three hours by car. Toronto has good shopping and famous attractions like the CN Tower, the tallest free standing structure in the world. The first Hard Rock Caf in North America is also located in downtown Toronto. At night, the theatrical performances, although they are a little expensive, are a must-see. The Amtrak train to Toronto is $77 round trip and hotels range from $60 per night for the Best Western Primrose to $90 per night for Le Royal Meridien King.

Niagra FallsThe closest option, Niagara Falls, is only about an hour and a half away. As long as you’re 19, you can explore Casino Niagara, along with the city’s mix of clubs and bars. The falls themselves are amazing and not to be missed. There are also plenty of tourist-type museums and tours to keep you busy during the day. If you don’t have a car to drive to Niagara Falls, Amtrak is a good last- minute option, and a round trip ticket only costs $49. Hotels are also pretty reasonably priced, ranging from the Radisson Hotel at $56 per night, to the Marriott Fallsview for $86 per night.

ClevelandForget the old nickname “The Mistake on the Lake,” Cleveland really does have some interesting attractions. Only a four-hour car ride away, Cleveland is the home of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, along with some interesting science museums and the Cleveland Metroparks Zoo. Many professional sports teams are also based out of Cleveland, and the city’s art museum is a nice smaller museum that would be worthwhile to visit. Amtrak can get you to Cleveland for $57 round trip. Hotels are anywhere from $60 per night at the Hampton Inn, to $86 per night at the Wyndham Hotel.



A Day in the Life: Todd Theatre’s “Fellowship” actor

Written by Sam Chanse, directed by Dominique Rider, and commissioned through alumna Natalie Hurst ‘74 and the New Voice Initiative, the show exhibits the interpersonal conflicts between four women of color as they navigate both a liberally-sensitive workplace and how the differences between them and their colleagues affect their insecurities and treatment of each other.

‘The Needle’: in no particular order

The more I think about 'The Needle,' the more I seem to enjoy it.

The ‘Try Guys’ try: putting the finishing blow on ‘wife guy’ culture

To all the self-proclaimed “wife guys” that we loved before: so long, sweethearts.