In the interest of keeping up with peer universities, UR needs to stay competitive in a number of areas, including athletics quality game coverage for fans, athletes, prospective students and other schools about the sports in our ever-growing athletic program suffers until the University provides the sports information director with additional staff.
Every University Athletic Association school has a sports information director and with the exception of UR and Brandeis University an assistant who helps with the duties and tasks that come with the job.

There are 21 varsity teams now at the University, but still only one full-time employee, the sports information director, whose job it is to manage and disseminate information for these teams.

Anyone who goes on the Athletics’ Web site would realize that one person’s effort is not enough stories aren’t always updated promptly and rosters are often out of date putting a poor face on the strong athletics program here at UR.

And it is for not lack of trying or hard work on Sports Information Director Dennis O’Donnell’s part. It points directly to the lack of necessary recourses, such as an assistant director. An assistant would be able to help with the myriad of duties that range from writing game recaps and box scores, updating the Web site and putting together the game notes for each of the sports’ home games, as well as making programs for the home football and basketball games.

There is only so much that one full-time employee can do.

While UR’s noted more for its academics than its sports, this is no reason that the outward face of the department, maintained by the sports information director, should have deficient resources.



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