Security officers went to the basement of Fairchild at 1:57 a.m., April 8, in response to a student security aide’s report that a room appeared to have been broken into.

En route, an officer encountered four individuals carrying two “microfridge” units in the tunnel, according to UR Security investigator Dan Lafferty.

After arriving on the scene, the officer noted that the door to the room was forcibly opened and, upon checking, the officer found that the room was used for storage.

The officer then returned to the individuals carrying the microfridges. Upon spotting the officer, one of the suspects immediately fled.

The remaining three were identified as undergraduate students, one of whom admitted to the officer that he had entered the room after finding it open and took the two microfridges to put in his room.

The two others told officers that the third person told them he was going to give the units to friends.

Despite the officer’s directions one of the students continually reached into his front pocket and was repeatedly told to remove his hand from his pocket.

As additional officers arrived, the suspect who kept reaching into his pocket bolted and fled from the officers.

He was later found hiding in the bushes next to the old rail road bridge in River Lot.

The suspect was soaking and told officers that he had been hiding in the river for about 15 minutes.

Officers searched the suspect and found that he had a large knife in his pocket.

The suspect told officers that he had consumed 16 alcoholic beverages between 10 p.m. and 1:15 a.m. The knife was confiscated and the student was transported to Strong Memorial Hospital Emergency Department for further evaluation and treatment.

The remaining students were interviewed and released by the security supervisor. The two units were collected and taken to the security offices for safekeeping.

Student sees own car burglarized from room

An undergraduate student reported that he heard a car alarm going off in Wilson North Lot on March 30 around 12:16 a.m. and, upon looking out from his room in Chambers, discovered that the alarm was coming from his own vehicle.

The student observed an unidentified suspect remove items from the trunk of his car and get into a pickup truck with another suspect.

The suspects then drove out of the lot and the student checked his car to find the suspects had broken out the driver side window.

The student also discovered that the suspects had accessed the truck and stole stereo equipment from the trunk, according to Security Investigator Dan Lafferty.

The property was estimated to be worth $1,500.

UR Security and the Rochester Police Department were notified and reports were filed.

Student held up by man without a weapon

Around 8 p.m. on March 3, an Eastman School of Music undergraduate was walking along Gibbs Street in front of the Eastman Theatre when he was approached by a lone suspect.

The suspect told the student that he had a gun, and demanded that the student hand over his wallet. After the student gave the suspect nine dollars, the suspect told the student that he really did not have a gun and just wanted to see whether or not the student would give him money.

The student asked for his money back, but the suspect denied the request, telling him that he was going to get a beer with the money.

The suspect then fled the area and the student summoned security who contacted the Rochester Police Department.

A subsequent follow up resulted in the suspect being found in a night club. The student positively identified the suspect.

Michael Perry, a 28-year-old Rochester resident, was arrested by police on charges of first degree robbery and grand larceny and taken into custody.

There was no weapon displayed and the student was not injured during this incident. The case is now pending in the judicial system, according to UR Security.

Information provided by UR Security.

Schnee can be reached at cschnee@campustimes.org.



‘My Messy Mind’ has a personality of its own

Her music screams for your attention, but in a natural “you know you’ll find yourself here” and not in a “LOOK AT ME” type of way.

How to balance college and mental health

I won’t lie — it’s hard to balance college and emotional well-being. But it’s not impossible to find balance.

Pep-less in Seattle

If greatness, achievement, or Ohio State’s Best Damn Band In The Land tickles your fancy, ditch those high hopes for rugby and a worn-out kazoo.