In the spirit of recent national anti-Bush tours, such as “Vote for a Change,” featuring acts like the Dave Matthews Band, Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band and Pearl Jam, and “Rock Against Bush,” which includes punk-rock bands such as Anti-Flag and Midtown, three of our own UR groups are taking a similar political stand. The concert, titled “Rock for Democracy,” includes student bands, Element Groove, More Cowbell and the In Debt Quintet. Not all groups, however, have a political agenda in their setlists. “Rock for Democracy” will take place this Sunday, in the Wilson Quad, from 1 to 5 p.m.Between sets, speakers will take the stage, discussing global issues that are currently of grave concern to our nation. “[The event] is about showing that students on campus are aware of what’s going on and are willing to take action in a creative form,” co-organizer Arthur Goldfeder said. One of the goals of “Rock for Democracy” “is to show that activism doesn’t have to be all in your face,” co-organizer David Ladon said. The event does not simply aim to allow anti-Bush students a venue in which to express their frustration with the Bush Administration, but it further intends to demonstrate that activism does not always take an extreme form. “Rock for Democracy” will allow students to voice their dissent in a fun and relaxed setting Although the concert is anti-Bush, students of all political affiliations are welcome. Nonpartisan voter registration tables will also be provided. For more information about the event, to address any questions or concerns or to participate, please contact David Ladon at 241-3582.Katz can be reached at jkatz@campustimes.org.



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