It’s sometimes hard to know whether a University proposal will live up to the hype. Fortunately, Dining Services’ plans for revamping eateries around campus have panned out.

The Engineering Quad now has healthy and fresh food options via OptiKale and a separate — and much needed — venue for caffeine needs via Peet’s. The terrifyingly long Pura Vida lines are now a thing of the past. Peet’s also offers a wider range of drink options than Pura Vida did, giving the Engineering Quad a Starbucks-like option that students have always wanted.

The changes at the Pit, too, are impressive. The end of the contract with Blimpie has come to a merciful close, and has brought with it sandwiches of a much higher quality (the bread is freshly baked!) to campus. The toppings truly do seem ever-fresher. Though the options at Wok on Up taste similar to those that were available at Panda Express, there is a greater slate of vegetarian options, making more food choices available for all students.

Douglass Dining Hall has also surprised us with its new ice-cream station, and more stations running for longer times. Danforth’s hours, on the other hand, remain inconvenient and limited. It remains closed for dinner on Friday, and all day Saturday and Sunday. These hours put all of the load on Douglass all too often, resulting in big crowds and slow service.

Overall, Dining Services has accomplished what it promised and delivered better, more accessible dining options to students. Even if the changes might not be to the liking of every student on campus, it’s clear that a University department heard our grievances, considered them thoughtfully, and worked to improve.

That’s something we need more of.  



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