Very often we are taught how to apply for jobs, how to prepare a resum and how to interview. In fact, our school has an entire office just for that purpose. However, we are seldom taught to say, “I hate this work environment. Peace.”

I recently had an experience with a psycho-maniac boss and after working for her for nearly half a year, I knew the day had come. I needed to quit.

This decision left me bereft of ideas. I had never quit a job because I disliked the environment – I normally had another excuse, such as moving away for school or a busy schedule.

I began to brainstorm the manner and means in which I would leave that position permanently. I came up with three solutions.

I first thought that I could walk right into her office, drop off the key, and say “I will never work for a psycho-maniac like you,” and walk right out. Although this solution seems extreme, I have actually seen examples of it and believe me, it gets the message across loud and clear. I first saw this method in action during high school, when my best friend decided to quit her job. Her manager was infuriating her and in a rash moment she threw down her apron and walked right out the door. This method, I decided, was not for me. I appreciate the valiance of such a move, but I myself am hesitant of such audacious actions. Thus, I continued to search for an alternative approach.

My next idea was to send an e-mail with a small white lie – a busy semester prevents me from maintaining a job. While it may be true that I have a busy semester, I am able to manage my time well. In fact, before even quitting this work place, I had already acquired another job with higher pay and a friendlier boss. Even still, this method appealed to me because I would never have to confront “the maniac” and my explanation would not be questioned. Had I struck gold? I decided against this solution – it seemed too dishonest and backhanded. I have not yet been deceptive and I would not become such in order to avoid a momentarily loathsome situation.

My final thought was to walk into her office, keys in hand, and ask to speak with her for a moment. This option provided the smoothest parting possible. I explained that I have moved on to another job because of the higher base pay and a more comfortable work environment. It would be overkill to add my complete distaste for her treatment of humanity or that I would die if I had to stare at her computer screen ever again.

I returned the keys and zipped out of there. The walk from her office and out of the Med Center was likely my happiest stride since I had started there in April.

Truth be told, it may not matter what method the employee selects – it really depends on the situation and aspirations for future relations.

If you are hoping to receive a recommendation, definitely choose option three. If, however, you just want to get the hell out of there, have a little fun – go for option one. Either way, once you’ve stated your business, the job is done.

Audrey can be reached at aricketts@campustimes.org



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