Many of us were skeptical about whether or not the pub was going to be built, since it is a year overdue. After more than two years of discussion and planning, it looks as though this pub will become a reality this spring.

There is no doubt that this pub has potential to vastly improve student life in Wilson Commons. It will be a place where students, faculty and staff members can go to socialize, eat and drink.

As of now, the dining operations for the pub will be run by ARAMARK and will be on a cash-only basis. Credit cards, Flex and dining plans will not be accepted. The rationale of not allowing Flex because of a fear that students will waste all their money on alcohol is silly. Students who are 21 are adults and how they spend their, or their parents’, money is not for the school to decide.

Similar to soda in the Corner Store, alcohol cannot be purchased with declining because of tax restrictions. However, the Corner Store still allows declining balance to be used for items which are not restricted, and the pub should work the same way. Alcohol and food can be sold separately from one another. We fail to see the difference from the Corner Store.

The pub needs to be convenient in order to be popular, and disallowing methods of payment other than cash will prevent this. No underclassmen will pay cash for food in the pit if they can just use a dining plan downstairs in the Pit. As long as UR complies by the laws of New York State, all available payment methods should be accepted in the pub. The university has no reason to restrict payment, as long as the law is followed.

Not permitting credit cards, Flex and dining plans is simply unacceptable on part of the university, and needs to be fixed. We should do everything in our power to make this trial period a huge success that leads to the permanent revival of the pub, and that means making the pub a pleasant and convenient location.



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