Undergrads should spend the rest of the semester off campus, an email from UR said.

Classes will be held online for the rest of the semester, and spring break will be extended for two days to prepare. Students will be allowed to return to dorms to gather their belongings, though guidelines for doing so have not yet been released. Students who are unable to return to their homes will continue to have access to dorms and dining halls but will be required to take their courses online.

The decision is the latest development in the University of Rochester’s response to the COVID-19 outbreak in the U.S.

“As the University of Rochester, we have both a commitment and a responsibility to work in the best interests of our students, faculty, staff, patients, as well as our community more broadly,” the email, which was sent shortly before 2 p.m., said.

Most campus gatherings will additionally be limited to 25 people, though some important meetings and gatherings are allowed to have at most 100 people present through the end of the semester. Meetings are required to be cancelled, postponed, or held virtually going forward.

On Monday, UR announced restrictions on university-sponsored and supported domestic and international travel. Previously it had also barred events and gatherings of more than 100 people. 

Updates on how UR is addressing COVID-19 issues can be found on the University’s COVID-19 website and emails from UR Communications.

This is a developing story, and the Campus Times will continue to provide updates.



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