Ever wonder what UR has to offer as far as drama activities or how to get involved? Here is a brief run-down of drama opportunities at UR.

Off Broadway On Campus is a student-run group which performs a musical review every semester, along with outside shows throughout the year. No auditions are required to belong to the group, so anyone can get involved.

“It’s very lively, peppy and it’s fun,” senior Anna Fagan, a theater minor, said. The group is known for its quality vocal performances. OBOC is a younger group which meets three times a week from 10 p.m. to 12 p.m. in Wilson Commons, either in the May Room or Gowen Room.

“It’s a variable schedule, so you get to choose how much you want to be involved,” Fagan said. Outside activities are also done with the group and joining is just as easy as showing up to a rehearsal in Wilson Commons.

Drama House is a special interest housing option that is open to anyone, not specifically to those completely devoted to theater. Each person living there is required to construct a house project. It does a lot to incorporate people outside of Drama House, too. Fireside chats are done with professors, parties are hosted and outside groups hold rehearsals at the house.

“People outside Drama House are totally welcome. You don’t have to be in Drama House to be in a Drama House play,” Fagan said.

The application process for residency in Drama House takes place at the end of the school year.

In Between the Lines is an improvisational group on campus which has its first performance this Thursday night. Open rehearsals for the group take place Monday nights or during the day on Fridays at the Drama House. Members are required to attend rehearsals and being a part of the improv group is a real commitment, but the participants are a tight-knit group of friends. Potential new members will soon have the chance to audition.

The Todd Theatre Program/International Theatre Program generally performs two shows per semester. This year, they are putting on a musical.

“I’m so excited that Todd is doing its first musical ever this year,” sophomore Anna Kroup, an active member of Todd Theater, said. “I’m really excited that I could be a part of it.”

Auditions for the musical are in October and performances will take place in February. The first play of the year is already cast and will be performed in October. The program utilizes the black box theater.

“The space is used very creatively. It’s very innovative and sometimes abstract,” Fagan said.

The program is fun but a very big commitment. Performing in a Todd show is worth four credits, along with behind-the-scenes work such as stage lighting and building sets. Classes are offered through the English department correlating to Todd Theatre so the same amount of time for a class, if not more, is required of participants.

At the end of spring semester, a One Act Play Festival takes place. Students are encouraged to write their own one act plays and submit them to judges at Todd Theatre. A few of the plays are chosen and then student directors cast other students to put on the performance.

“The whole festival is student run. Stage management, directing, writing and acting are all done by students,” Fagan said.

After the plays are performed, the judges also give out awards in various theatrical categories.

So this year, be sure to check out at least one of the abundant drama performances here on campus.

Richards is a member of the class of 2010.



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