New information has led UR security to believe that the cat that was found mutilated on Sigma Chi’s door Dec. 2 was killed off campus.

Also, a house on the Fraternity Quad will not be allowed to house new members next year, following a letter sent by Interim Dean of Students Jody Asbury and Director of Residential Life Logan Hazen.

The Campus Times foudn out that the house refered to is Delta Kappa Epsilon.

Attached to the letter was a questionnaire which called for residents to “provide honest and factual information” regarding the time between 11 a.m. on Dec. 1 and 3:45 a.m. on Dec. 2. The questionnaire deals with the handling of the cat after it brought to campus.

Hazen feels that the honor report will give the fraternities a chance to fully cooperate with the investigation.

“We met with certain groups and gave them a process,” Hazen said, referring to the questionarie.

Dean of Students in charge of discipline Ken Rockensies feels that the forms will aid in determining whether or not houses will be able to allow new residents into their houses next year. “My understanding is that we want to cast as broad a net as possible and give students every possible chance – during this phase of the review process – to provide information in writing that will help with the investigation,” Rockensies said.

Response

President of DKE and junior Eric Dubowsky feels that the house will be dramatically affected by the decision that new residents will not be allowed to live in their house next year. “The freshman even if separated by a distance on campus will not be disassociated with this fraternity,” Dubowsky said. “If anything the bond between us has grown stronger in the face of adversity on this campus.”

While she did not name DKE as the fraternity discussed in her letter, Asbury did say that she had reservations regarding the house on the Quad that will not be allowed to have new residents for next year. “There are concerns about conduct that suggest that [the house] is not a healthy community,” Asbury said.

Dubowsky feels that DKE has been unfairly targeted and slandered by the administration, faculty and students. “It’s been tough,” he said. “A lot of rumors and lies are floating around campus. The way this [incident] has been handled has made people make assumptions.”

“We’ve had a pretty clean history for as long as I’ve been here, and for this one thing to destroy our traditions is disturbing,” Dubowsky added.

While realizing that the university has been affected by the cat incident and needs to have its name cleared, Dubowsky also feels that DKE needs to protect the rights of its new members.

Asbury also feels that the university needs to clear the names of the fraternities. “We told the alumni that we will do anything we can once this matter is cleared up.”

Duboswky feels that DKE will continue to flourish in the future. “I don’t have a doubt in my mind that Delta Kappa Epsilon will not only get through this incident, but we will excel through out the upcoming years in the Rochester community,” he said.

“Members are leaders of athletic teams, greek life, academic societies, student association, orientation, and relief,” Duboswky added. “Our members are separated by age, race, and religion, that brings a sense of diversity that our brotherhood thrives on everyday. Our achievements on campus are of substantial significance and add to the growing pride we hold in our brotherhood.”

Possible felony?

As a result, the felony aggravated assault to animals “probably did not occur,” according to the letter, which sent to residents and members of the Fraternity Quad.

If a felony did not occur, then the cat must have killed by a car, due to the condition of the cat.

The conclusion of the Humane Society’s Chief Veterinarian Doctor Andy Newmark, along with veterinarian, was that the cat was not killed by a car. “Somebody did this to him. The sort of injuries here were different than if the cat had been hit by a car, where the blow is more crushing,” Newmark told the CT in January. “When an animal has been hit by a car, it’s usually only in one location, not all over like this animal.”

Asbury feels that it is possible that the cat was found as roadkill and brought to the campus, despite the fact that the District Attorney’s office rejected the notion.

“We met with certain groups and gave them a process,” Hazen said, referring to the questionnaire.

Dean of Students in charge of discipline Ken Rockensies believes that the forms will aid in determining whether or not houses will be able to allow new residents into their houses next year. “My understanding is that we want to cast as broad a net as possible and give students every possible chance during this phase of the review process to provide information in writing that will help with the investigation,” Rockensies said.

Response

DKE will be dramatically affected by the decision that new residents will not be allowed to live in their house next year according to President of DKE and junior Eric Dubowsky.

“The freshmen, even if separated by a distance on campus, will not be disassociated with this fraternity,” Dubowsky said. “If anything the bond between us has grown stronger in the face of adversity on this campus.”

While she did not name DKE as the fraternity discussed in her letter, Asbury did say that she had reservations regarding the house on the Quad that will not be allowed to have new residents for next year. “There are concerns about conduct that suggest that [the house] is not a healthy community,” Asbury said.

Some believe that DKE has been unfairly targeted and slandered by the administration, faculty and students. “It’s been tough,” he said. “A lot of rumors and lies are floating around campus. The way this [incident] has been handled has made people make assumptions.”

“We’ve had a pretty clean history for as long as I’ve been here, and for this one thing to destroy our traditions is disturbing,” Dubowsky added.

While realizing that the university has been affected by the cat incident and needs to have its name cleared, Dubowsky also wants to protect the rights of its new members.

Asbury also said that the university needs to clear the names of the fraternities. “We told the alumni that we will do anything we can once this matter is cleared up.”

Dubowsky feels that DKE will continue to flourish in the future. “I don’t have a doubt in my mind that DKE will not only get through this incident, but we will excel through out the upcoming years in the Rochester community,” he said.

Possible felony

As a result, the felony of aggravated assault to animals “probably did not occur,” according to Asbury’s letter, which was sent to residents and members of the Fraternity Quad.

If a felony did not occur, then the cat must have been killed by a car, due to the condition of the cat.

The conclusion of the Humane Society’s Chief Veterinarian Doctor Andy Newmark, along with other veterinarians, was that the cat was not killed by a car.

Asbury feels that it is possible that the cat was found as roadkill and brought to the campus, despite the fact that both medical evidence and the District Attorney’s office rejected the notion.

Schnee can be reached at cschnee@campustimes.org.



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