Get ready to enjoy an evening at the annual Caribbean Carnival this Saturday from 4 to 8 p.m. on Dandelion Square and the Wilson Commons Lawn.

Sponsored by the Black Students? Union, Caribbean Carnival 2001 will consist of a number of musical performances throughout the night as well as many displays from area merchants.

?My hope for the Carnival this year is to reach all nationalities,? junior and co-president of Black Students? Union Alex Ampadu said. ?The purpose of the Carnival is not just for Caribbean people. It is for all of us to understand and experience the Caribbean culture.?

Ampadu said that the Caribbean Carnival has different performers each year, but the general carnival remains the same. This year?s performers will include the Borinquen Dance Troupe performing at 6 p.m. and the reggae band ?The Outkasters? at 7 p.m., as well as several other local performers.

Vendors will be selling arts and crafts and offering Caribbean food.

There is also going to be an after party in the May Room of Wilson Commons. The after party is sure to be a blast with students dancing and Caribbean music blaring.

?It?s one of the biggest parties of the year,? Ampadu said, he encourages all to attend and join in the festivities.

The party is $5, but the Caribbean Carnival is free and open to the public, so clear your calendar for the evening and check out the great performers and food.

Roberts can be reached at rroberts@campustimes.org.



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