Looking for the perfect Holiday gift? Something cheap but classy, personal but generic, red but green? Look no further: The Campus Times Cup has everything!

Made from a flexible, semi-durable plastic, the CT Cup can handle it all. Its condensation-resistant material keeps things both cool and dry. It’s got the perfect width for both dainty lady hands and big, rough, lumberjack man hands. And it even holds the perfect amount of drink with a material that has a fantastic mouth-feel! Featuring a beautiful, difficult-to-read font and image design, with an astoundingly mediocre build, it has been rated “an all-around okay cup” by tens of customers.

 

Pick up several and surprise your mom by leaving them half-full around the house all week! (I have 18 ready to go myself). You may also find it useful for catching the poopoo water leaking from your Southside ceiling. Its flimsy build also makes it easy to fold to get to those hard-to-reach areas, making it great for watering plants and performing your routine enema.

 

The CT Cup has many uses, including, but not limited to:

  • Salsa-holder (due to its perfect chip width) (see fig. A)
  • Critter catcher (fig. B)
  • Hats for your roommate’s five cats (fig. C)
  • Gravy boat, and to collect the tears shed over the politics at your Thanksgiving dinner table-Inserted into Turkey Bum for extra plastic flavor — mmmm

 

Figure A

Figure B

 

Figure C

Stop by the CT office before you head home and pick up your CT Cups! (Please, we beg you, we have far too many. We don’t want them and we are worried they may soon become sentient.

 



CT Cooks: Louise’s baked oatmeal

Let’s be real. Oatmeal gets a bad rap. I, like many of you, once thought of it as a weird, bland, mushy thing that was exclusively for old people.

Now what? Graduating during a pandemic

After studying remotely from Los Angeles this semester, Harris has found her academic interests shifting. 

This is a Rush Rhees Library appreciation post

I am no architecture student, but the blend of Doric columns — borrowed from classical Greece — with the red brick of the mid-20th century makes it feel like a modern temple.