Given the recent snowstorm and UR’s notorious habit of not cancelling classes, we went around asking people what they thought of it.

 

 

Caitlin Fitz (first-year): “I’m not particularly bothered by the University not cancelling classes during severely inclement weather. Since I live on campus and facilities does a decent job clearing walkways, I have not run into any issues getting to class, especially thanks to the tunnel system.”

 

Tharan Mungara (first-year): “It’s very sad, because I can’t wake up on time, and it’s too much of a hassle to get to class on time, and eat. So it’s hard to attend class fully prepared.”


Tony Lai (first-year): “I think it cuts both ways, right? Because faculty and staff also have to bear the bad weather conditions. It also doesn’t necessarily bother [or] affect [most of us] because a lot of us live on campus, and all campus housing is accessible by foot. So I think not cancelling classes is fine, but I can totally see why a case can be made that it’s dangerous and endangers the lives of commuter students. But for the most part, I think most students can walk to campus in 10-15 minutes.”

 

Kai Avni (first-year): “I guess it depends on the amount of people who have to commute, and the impact the snowstorm would have on their commute.”

 

 

Anna Lussier (first-year): “Well, I think it’s unfair to everyone that doesn’t cough up money to live on campus. It’s dangerous to all the professors, commuters, and especially to students who live off campus and can’t afford a car. Imagine having to walk two miles to school in negative-degree weather and freezing snow squalls. I get that this is Rochester, but some respect for the people who already have to deal with enough shit to get to campus every day would be nice.”

         

Tagged: weather


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