The city of Rochester has received much praise over the years on its artistic and musical culture. Contributing to this culture, UR has continued to emphasize the growth of the arts through its exhibitions in the student-supported Hartnett Gallery. The current exhibition “in the works” features artwork created by the faculty of UR’s Sage Art Center.

It illuminates the complexities and openness of the artists’ mediums by providing a glimpse of the art that they’ve finished or are in the process of developing, hence the name. 

Immediately upon entering Hartnett, there were numerous creations that I was excited to look at. I started with the ones closest to the door -rounded sculptures with metallic elements. They gave me a feeling of satisfaction with the simplicity that they carried. 

The artist of “Pound and Sweep #2,” Joshua Enck, used a metallic border to represent the structured life of craftsmanship and the imagination seeping through in blue.

 Further in the gallery were the edgier abstracts, like the photographs in polyester, and “Eyrie,” a contemporary structure made of steel, copper, and patina. 

Down the steps, were a series of social commentary artworks, named “Form/Function 1, 2 & 3.” The artist, Allen Topolski, used a digital method to express people’s desire for a productive rest.

“Monuments to,” was a lively assortment of elements, and “Happy Meal with How Things Are Made Vol.2,” a screen print that emphasized the relationship between food value and distribution practices.

Similar to the screenprint, Kirby Pilcher’s archival inkjet prints that covered the Ogallala Aquifer and its effects on the land and culture of its inhabitants. 

Further on the left were some emotional art on display. The first,Wishful Thinking,” emphasized the need for people to be better, whether that means more empathetic and understanding or knowing your own self-worth in relationships that aren’t healthy. 

Last in the exhibit was an homage to artist Louise Bourgeois, titled “Heal Your Own Heart.” The artist, Janet Catherine Berlo, created a mixed-media work from fiber, fabric, and thread. It depicts her meditative experience with spinning and needlework to create art that helped her heal. The installation, marked with red yarn, thread, bones, and tools, presented  a reassuring take on the turmoil that we sometimes endure to grow and learn from our emotional wounds.

The exhibition will have a reception, titled “Wine and Cheese Wednesday,” on September 18th from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. The exhibition will be open until September 26th. 



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