Students, Public Safety officers, and University staff members teamed up Tuesday evening to survey locations on and off campus in need of better lighting as a part of the annual Walk for Light event.

Walk for Light began as an initiative in 1986 implemented by the Students’ Association (SA) Government in response to the first on-campus blue light installation in 1985, with the overall goal of making UR’s campus safer.

“One of the early issues DPS had with blue light placement was that students took different routes from their classes depending on when the class let out,” Assistant Director of Public Safety Dana Perrin said.

This issue spurred the idea of involving students in the process of placing blue lights on campus, Perrin explained, and changes have been made as a result of students’ recommendations.

Attendees sorted themselves into small groups and surveyed Wilson Boulevard, the pedestrian foot bridge, Intercampus Drive, the route from Wilson Commons to Hill Court, and the areas around recent construction.

“I think by incorporating faculty and staff with students at this event, it will work to better campus life,” said junior and SA Executive Director of Campus Services Pauleen Sanchez. “It improves communication between students and departments, and allows for thoughts to be shared.”

Of the locations attendees determined needed better lighting was the walkway along Intercampus Drive, right below the Hill Court footbridge. The groups also determined that the emergency call phones in each of the Hill Court buildings were poorly labeled, and that most students were unaware of this service.

“I think this will cause fewer people to think when walking, ‘I need to get to a more lit spot more quickly,’” junior Ti Tracy said. “I’ve felt this way here, and I’ve crossed the street just to get to better lighting.”



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