The first thing that comes to mind when virtually anyone in the world hears the words Manchester United is soccer. This is the end result of a global campaign that Manchester United has been on for the past three decades. Manchester United, with over 600 million fans worldwide, has become a global brand that has been pulling in a massive profit for the greater part of the past five years. In fact, Manchester United pulls in around 600 million dollars a year, and is the first sports team in the world to be valued at over 3 billion dollars.

Recently, Manchester United has taken a turn for the worse, and the globalization campaign that has characterized Manchester United for the large part of the 20th and 21st centuries has been put in jeopardy. Ever since United’s iconic manager, Sir Alex Ferguson, farewell address and his subsequent retirement last season, United has been destined for failure. The stability and aura of calmness that Sir Alex Ferguson gave to United for over two decades, washed away as soon as Ferguson retired.

Soccer has become much more globalized than it was when Ferguson first took charge. Club management and soccer fans alike have become much less patient when it comes to disappointing results. In this increasingly unstable and competitive environment, it was not exactly the best time for Ferguson to retire and for United to try to find a new candidate to take over his legacy. David Moyes, United’s newly appointed manager, has frankly not been able to handle the pressure that comes with taking charge of one of the world’s most powerful brand.

Manchester United’s recent misfortunes have had more consequences than some would expect. Success on the pitch was a major attraction, drawing fans from around the world. Both Ferguson’s retirement and Manchester United’s noticeable drop in form this past season has started to affect United’s global image. Manchester United and avid soccer fans will continue to watch and see how this pivotal season will affect United in years to come.

John Chtchekine is a member of 

the class of 2016



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