More than just paint: advertising in tunnels has multiple purposes

Courtesy of img1.etsystatic.com

Tunnel painting has become a tradition for many organizations on campus, all which have the intention to advertise in a positive manner. Some paint jobs advertise the performance of an ensemble while others advertise the positive values an organization stands for. That being said, even though a tunnel painting may not be for a specific event, any PR is good PR.

While everyone is entitled to their own personal opinions toward any group on campus, it is also everyone’s responsibility to respect each and every one of these organizations. Targeting a group on campus and implying that they should not be allowed to advertise is not by any means respectful. I cannot speak for all organizations on campus, but within the Panhellenic community, we use the tunnels to advertise our values of sisterhood, loyalty and service, which are all genuine values we uphold and believe in. We may not all be advertising for a specific event, but advertising the wholesome beliefs we stand for merits equal attention.

As for respecting other group events, we would like to formally apologize for the disruption of any other advertisements in the tunnels. It is not our intention to limit the advertisement of another organization and for that we are sincerely sorry. To curb these miscommunications in the future, it may be in the campus’ best interest to create a system to reserve time slots for sections of the painted tunnel. The Panhellenic community already uses a system between chapters to ensure the fairness of tunnel painting, and to avoid painting over one another’s paint job. This system could be implemented campus-wide to avoid future mishaps, and all organizations could be reminded to be respectful of other advertisements in the tunnels. The success of this system has strengthened the relationships between chapters and has had a positive effect overall within our community.

Through tunnel painting, we are simply advertising the successes of our chapters and displaying appreciation for the organizations we are proud to be a part of on this campus. Advertising does not only relate to marketing an upcoming event — it also has to do with the advertisement of beliefs and accomplishments we are honored to stand for. To be part of a community that embraces the support of one another, service through volunteer work and the drive to succeed in all aspects of campus life is something we should be able to advertise.

Evans is a member of the class of 2014. She writes on behalf of Panhellenic Association.



You can contact Julia at jevans6@u.rochester.edu.

    9 Responses to “More than just paint: advertising in tunnels has multiple purposes”

    1. JONATHAN ISAACS says:

      I will start by saying that i appreciate the attempt at an apology. however, this entire article is pretty much a lie. if there was some differentiation between the sororities tunnel paintings then the case could be made that individual morals are being expressed but when the painting are reduced to statements like “I love my little” and “I have the greatest big ever” they are just shallow expressions that hopefully don’t reflect the depth of sorority actions and intellect. There is no way that the painting in the tunnel can be seen as advertising of anything more than superficial love. further more, the entire section that states that there should be a system seems to say “well its the other people’s fault for painting just before we planned our painting”. how hard would it be to read the date of the event and not cover it? is that not a good enough system? rarely is the entire tunnel taken by events that are yet to happen. In conclusion this article should have been critiqued prior to publication because it reads as a declaration of “f*** you other groups we dont care and will continue to cover what ever we chose under the guise of ‘advertising’”

      • Suj says:

        Who are you to judge something you have absolutely no understanding of? If you think our organizations are the type that have no disregard to other groups then you are sorely misinformed, almost all sorority women are involved non-greek co-curricular activities, and I believe you’ve based your opinions through isolated events and stereotypes.
        This article was not an attempt at an apology at all, but an acknowledgement that yes, we have upset other organizations in the past and that yes, we are willing to work with the community to remedy this. Sometimes it isn’t just as simple as looking at the dates, sometimes it is, and sometimes we get yelled at even when we’ve reached out to groups beforehand. Groups that have felt wronged in the past I encourage to make connections with those sororities so that there is mutual understanding and fostering of respect for all organizations – and we can work on having a campus that has open communication (hopefully not only about TUNNEL PAINTING for gods sake.)
        If you’d further like to talk about this, I’d definitely like to hear why you have such an animosity towards sororities who – yeah, just sometimes want to express how much they love their little. It’s a great way to advertise one of the many rewarding relationships that are formed when you join a sorority. I love my little because she’s spunky, has a great heart, works hard and is my friend and support system. I’m sorry you think that’s superficial but I guess you’ll never understand if you’ve never experienced it and that’s something you need to come to terms with, but please don’t disrespect it – frankly, it’s rude.
        Again, I really don’t think online article responses really go anywhere in terms of understanding – if you truly care about the lack of communication between student groups and sororities you can contact me whenever and I’d be more than happy to have a conversation with you: shyun@u.rochester.edu

        • JONATHAN ISAACS says:

          I feel as though you completely validated my point. This article starts out as an ‘apology’ then goes in to blame everyone else for not participating in sororities system. I never said sororities didn’t have the right to paint I merely commented that if they think that what is painting is some form of advertising of who they are sorely mistaken. it is a reflection of the shallowness that pervades sorority interactions. I don’t doubt that sorority members are too members of other groups that was not contested. what was contested was that they are showing a unique advertisement of the individual sorority morals and wholesome beliefs by advertising love for someone they have known for a month or two at best. please don’t attempt to defend this act as the proof is smeared across the walls multiple times a semester.

          • xyang says:

            I love John Maynard Smith too. He’s spunky, has a great heart, works hard and is one of the top theoretical biologists of the century. I’m going to paint his name over half of the tunnels because it’s an “advertisement” for academic excellence and research rigor. And f*** you if you disagree.

    2. Ernald Waltz says:

      If I ever doubted the average intelligence of those partaking in greek life before reading this article, I’m certainly more sure of their stupidity now.

    3. xyang says:

      “The study found that Greek-affiliated men had significantly lower end-of-first-year scores on standardized measures of reading comprehension, mathematics, critical thinking, and composite achievement than their non-Greek counterparts…Women who joined sororities had lower end-of-first-year scores on all four cognitive measures than non-Greek women…The findings suggest that the normative peer culture and socially-orientated time commitments of Greek life often are inconsistent with the educational and intellectual mission of colleges and universities.” (Pascarella et al. 2001)

      “Rape-supportive attitudes are examined among a sample of university athletes, fraternity members, and controls. A sample of 477 males were recruited on a large southeastern university campus. Comparison of mean scores indicates that fraternity men reported significantly greater agreement with five statements supportive of rape and adversarial gender beliefs than did controls.” (Boeringer, 1999)

      “This study investigates the incidence and nature of sexual coercion among sorority women. Particular emphasis is placed on sexual coercion that occurs within the context of fraternal life. Overall, almost half of those studied had experienced some form of sexual coercion, 24% experienced attempted rape, and 17% were victims of completed rape. Almost half of the rapes occurred in a fraternity house, and over half occurred either during a fraternity
      function or was perpetrated by a fraternity member. This study provides evidence that fraternities represent a social context that tolerates, if not actually encourages, sexual coercion of women, including sorority women.” (Copenhaver and Grauerholz, 1991)

    4. Adam Lanman says:

      “I cannot speak for all organizations on campus, but within the Panhellenic community, we use the tunnels to advertise our values of sisterhood, loyalty and service, which are all genuine values we uphold and believe in. We may not all be advertising for a specific event, but advertising the wholesome beliefs we stand for merits equal attention.”

      Is that the reason? I’m not being sarcastic, I’ve always genuinely wondered why sororities felt is necessary to paint the tunnels with inside-jokes and messages. I’ve never gotten a message of wholesome beliefs of sisterhood, loyalty and service out of tunnel paint. Actually, my only reaction has been growing annoyance and the though “gee, what a waste of paint and space.”

      By all means, you have every right to continue to paint such things. Nobody suggests that sororities shouldn’t have the right to paint (you’re not exactly a persecuted minority in a school with 23% of students involved in greek life).

      Just remember two things:
      1) Do not cover up other groups’ advertising before their events have happened.
      2) Do not expect the university community to enjoy vapid messages of affection between total strangers.

      Cheers,
      Adam

    5. Cindy Zu says:

      “As for respecting other group events, we would like to formally apologize for the disruption of any other advertisements in the tunnels. It is not our intention to limit the advertisement of another organization and for that we are sincerely sorry. To curb these miscommunications in the future, it may be in the campus’ best interest to create a system to reserve time slots for sections of the painted tunnel. ”

      From this excerpt, I note:
      1) A formal apology.
      2) A proposed solution for the future.

      Seeing that this blatant message is still not satisfactory for some of you, I recommend:
      1) Finding a new hobby (spend your time on something more productive than being upset over paint in the tunnels. Perhaps knitting? Anime? Painting? See item 3)
      2) Study for finals– this is more important than bashing 23% of the undergraduate population regarding paint in tunnels. And seeing how terrible your arguments are, I highly recommend you hit the stacks.
      3) Go to Lowes, bring some money, buy yourself a brush and some paint, and paint over all the vapid, superficial, and shallow messages, come Spring 2013. That should solve any remaining concerns.

      Here’s a link to the paint section Lowes:
      http://www.lowes.com/pl_Paint+Interior+andor+Exterior_4294729373_4294937087_?cm_sp=Paint-_-Paint|PopularCat-_-Merch|Interior_Exterior_Paint&cm_cr=Paint-_-Web+Activity-_-Paint+Stain+Top+Flex+Activity-_-SC_Paint_TopFlexible_Area-_-188622_2_paint_Pop_Cat-2

      Go wild.

      • xyang says:

        An advertisement “is a form of communication used to encourage or persuade an audience to continue or take some new action.” (WP) Criticizing a few irresponsible organizations – Greek or otherwise – for using a public advertisement system for painting about their personal affections (which have NOTHING to do with advertising, regardless of how you spin it) is not, in the author’s words, “targeting a group on campus and implying that they should not be allowed to advertise”. That is the most ridiculous and dishonest strawman argument I’ve ever seen.

        That pile of nonsense, plus a silly excuse for an action clearly committed intentionally and consciously (“miscommunication”), does not constitute an apology. Especially when your proposed solution for your move is to claim that everybody else is at fault for not being part of the Greek system – followed by two long paragraphs of dick-waving about how the Greek society is such an “honored”, “successful” part of the university.

        There is really no need for a “proposed solution”. We already have a solution: Don’t be a dick and don’t paint over other groups’ advertisements. It’s that simple. And please drop that “persecuted minority” mentality while you contemplate on that.


    Comment...

    Login / Register

    Social

    Facebook Twitter RSS Email