With the end of the fall season on their heels, the women’s tennis team was determined go out with a bang.

The New York State Championship proved to be the Yellowjackets’ playground as they took one doubles and two singles titles.

Sophomore Frances Tseng played in spectacular fashion on her way to the No. 2 singles draw championship, only losing six games in her three singles matches.

“I felt pretty good looking back at the results,” Tseng said. “I knew this was the last tournament of the season so I had to play my best.”

Equally as impressive was junior captain Jamie Bow, who came back from a 0-6 first set in the finals to take the No. 4 singles championship.

Even being down 5-1 in the final tiebreaker, Bow showed poise as she battled back for the victory.

“Bow made a tremendous effort in winning the No. 4 singles draw,” head coach Matt Nielsen said. “Bow came into the tournament seeded No. 3 and upset the No. 1 seed from [New York University] in straight sets … I was extremely pleased with her ability to come back strong after losing the first set.”

To complete the sweep, Bow teamed up with senior captain Lia Weiner in the No. 2 doubles draw. They won the championship in a thrilling back and forth game against NYU, 9-7.

“They showed much poise under pressure, saving two match points and going on to win the match,” Nielsen said. “They have been working hard at improving their net play which is beginning to pay off in matches.”

Competing at the No. 1 singles spot, Weiner showed determination as she easily blew past the first two matches, only losing three games.

However, she couldn’t keep the momentum up eventually losing in the finals to the No. 2 ranked Christina Nunez from Ithaca College.

“I thought the team did very well, as this has been our best result at states since I’ve been at UR,” Weiner said. “For me the singles could’ve gone better though. [Nunez] was very good but I would’ve liked to have played better.”

Despite bringing home three championships, the Yellowjackets are looking ahead to the off-season where they can tweak and fine-tune their game for the upcoming season.

“We placed in more flights than we have in the past,” Bow said. “I think this tournament revealed things that we all can work on during the off season, so we can come back even stronger in the spring.”

Manrique is a member of the class of 2012.



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